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  • Thankgiving

    1 Thes 5:16-18

    How many of you celebrated Thanksgiving last week? I’m sure many of us joined our families, either through the terror of holiday travel or by staying at home and relaxing. Some of us probably watched the football games or caught up with grandma—and I’m positive everyone here ate plenty of food. But wait… How many of you remembered to give thanks? What does it even mean to be thankful? That’s not something we usually think about, even on the big day itself. Being thankful means we are appreciative of whatever gift we have received, and we feel the desire to give thanks for it. But, that still leaves the question: why don’t we give thanks year round?

    The Bible says in 1 Thessalonians 5:16-18, “Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.” I want you to pay attention to the idea of giving thanks in ALL circumstances, because that’s probably the thing most of us struggle with. It’s easy to give thanks when things are good—but what about when things are tough? For example, as much as Hurricane Harvey was a terrible disaster that left our school flooded and many other homes with feet of water in them, it gave us an opportunity to be thankful for what we have in life—thankful for the things that truly matter—for our homes and for the safety of our families, and even thankful for the smaller things like clean water and our electricity.

    We have many opportunities to give thanks year-round. We don’t just have to give our thanks on one day out of the year; instead we should give thanks whenever we can, because everything we have received has been through God’s grace. So right now, I challenge you, Covenant Academy, to not only give thanks for the large things, but also the small ones too. I challenge you to remember that no matter how dark times in your life may seem, what comes from that hardship will be something to be thankful for.

    And with that, I say “thank you!”


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Austin, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

  • Rhetoric Reflection: Selflessness

    “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”
    Philippians 2:4 (ESV)

    Carson and brother, Colton

    Something happened to me recently that really touched me, and I thought I would just share it with you. My dad loves road trips and camping; almost every night he will come home and research where to go and what to see. So, two weeks before school started, my family and I were planned to go on a road trip. Our plan was to drive out west to California and see all the great national parks such as Yosemite and the Redwood Forest. My dad had been planning this trip for at least a year. He even stayed up to 1 o’clock in morning to reserve camping spots. However, in June, we learned that my brother would have his championship swim meet the weekend we wanted to leave. This would leave us with not enough time for our vacation. My brother had been training all year and this meant a lot to him. So, what did my dad do? He cancelled the trip he had been looking forward to for many, many, years so my brother could swim two races. He put his dream on hold for someone else’s dream to come true. This is what we call being selfless. When someone possesses selflessness, it means they put others before themselves and realize, “Hey, I have to do what is right, even though it may be unpleasant."

    Carson and his dad, Rudi

    Upper School recently finished reading the book Up from Slavery about Booker T. Washington, who was a freed slave that rose to success through hard work and determination. Mr. Washington exemplified selflessness better than most. Listen to this! By the time he was a well-known figure, he was offered five million dollars to go around the country giving speeches about his life, but he turned it down! Why would he turn down five million dollars? Because he wanted to continue to be the principal of his school. He knew that his talents were better used as the leader of a school where the main goal was to help educate African Americans. To quote Mr. Washington, “I always prefer to do things rather than talk about doing them.” So, Mr. Washington was selfless enough to work for a cause he knew was important, rather than going around the country merely talking about what people should do.

    To tell you the truth, that hit me hard. Dr. Smith and I agree—we don’t think most of us would be able to do what Booker T. Washington did. It is a great reminder that we all need to put others before ourselves, especially with our school being rebuilt [after Hurricane Harvey] in the face of so many trials. The selfless actions of many volunteers is precisely why I’m able to stand on campus, in this room and deliver this speech to you today. Philippians 2:4 (ESV) perfectly sums up the attitude my dad, Booker T. Washington, and all the volunteers share. “Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.”

    So, Covenant, I leave you with this: think not of yourself, but of others. Think not of what is, but what could be. Think not of how great you, are but how greatly you can improve. Think not of how people have wronged you, but how you could fix those wrongs. Think not of glorifying yourself, but of glorifying God.


    Carson in ChapelAs part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Carson, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

  • What is Your Legacy?


    What is a legacy? Is it planting seeds in a garden you will never get to see? Is it making a name that will go on for generations? Is it something that you already have? Booker T Washington was a profound African American man who often pondered on this question.

    Washington grew up as a slave, and because people regrettably in that time did not see him as human, he did not know his legacy. He did not know his father. He knew his mother and his siblings, and he knew how to work and to work hard. So he spent his life working. He first worked in the salt mines to get an education. When he was in grade school his teacher asked what his last name was. He didn't know, he was never given one, so he said Washington. He didn’t know who he was or to whom he belonged and because of that he had no reason to work as hard as he did because the family name would not be marred if he failed.


    Booker T. Washington did not use this as an excuse but rather as a driving force for him to propel himself. He graduated and then started a school. He made a name for himself but more importantly he made a name for future generations. He made the Tuskegee Institute which was founded on hard work. He made a legacy of work.

    What legacy will you make? Unlike Washington, we know where we come from. Whether from our heavenly Father or from our mom and dad. We have a legacy left for us here at school. We have a legacy left by our graduates. We have a legacy left by our founding fathers Washington, Madison, Hamilton, and Henry.

    The question now is, are we going to pick up what's left for us to do? Are we going to finish the race? Run the race the best we can? We know where we come from, so what are we going to do with that? Will we bring up our family name, our house name and our name as Christians if we are in Christ, or will we not?

    What is your legacy? What seeds will you plant?


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Jon, one of our twelfth grade students (pictured).

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