Covenant Blog
  • Accountability

    “Love is patient, love is kind and is not jealous; love does not brag and is not arrogant, does not act unbecomingly; it does not seek its own, is not provoked, does not take into account a wrong suffered, does not rejoice in unrighteousness, but rejoices with the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.” 
    I Corinthians 13:4-7 (NASB)

    Every day, we are kept accountable. If you’re in grammar school, you have an accountability sheet that has to be signed. In upper school, uniform checks hold us accountable for following the school's uniform policy. These things, and countless others, are designed to make sure we are doing what we are meant to do.


    So, how does it feel when you get a mark on your accountability? Or, when a teacher calls you out for not doing your homework? It’s embarrassing, right? No one likes it when other people point out their mistakes. However, accountability is a good thing. If no one was there to check and see if you did your school work, would you be as likely to do it? But, homework is beneficial because it helps you remember the concepts you learned at school that day while you’re at home. Accountability helps to motivate you to do what is good for you and keep the standard to which you are held. We are always held to a standard. For students, this could be classroom rules and accountability sheets, academic expectations, or even physical requirements of a sport or P.E. However, we are all held to one standard, and it's the most important one we are meant to keep; God’s standard.


    "...we are all held to one standard, 
    and it's the most important one we are meant to keep;
    God’s standard."


    Because we love God, we try to live according to His Word. It is hard, though because His standard is perfection. That is why we need God’s strength and help from a community of godly brothers and sisters. Hebrews 10:23-25 says, “Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful; and let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near.” We are meant to encourage on another to love and do good. I Corinthians 13:7 tells us that "Love bears all things." That includes the weaknesses and mistakes of others. It means we love people and try to help them do what is best for them and hold the standard to which we are all called.

    In conclusion, I encourage all of you to keep one another accountable and to embrace accountability from others. But, most importantly, do it out of love for the Lord and for one another.


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Chessa W., one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

  • Jack of All Trades

    “For just as we have many members in one body and all the members do not have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, each of us is to exercise them accordingly…”  Romans 12:4-16 (NASB)


    As you may know, the track season has recently ended. During the season I was hard at work training with the rest of the Covenant team to be ready for our meets. However, after going to my first meet, I quickly realized something. When you are competing with big muscular guys who can hurl a discus nearly twice as far as you, you are reminded that God has gifted each of us with many different talents. Although we may have many strengths in one area, it is likely that we have weaknesses in another. Someone may be great at writing papers, but then they get nervous when it comes time to present them to an audience. Or they could be an amazing artist, but struggle with finishing all their work in Rocket Math on time. Where some may do poorly, others may excel and this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.


    Brandon and family at Easter

    When we are given a gift, we are supposed to use it to glorify God and help others. In the process, many relationships and careers and opportunities are formed. What would be the use for a Greek teachers if all of his or her students could speak fluent Greek, or a plumber if his clients could fix their own pipes? Instead, the strengths and talents we possess can be used to provide for others, and to help them in the areas they struggle. Romans 12:4-16 (NASB) says, “For just as we have many members in one body and all the members do not have the same function, so we, who are many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. Since we have gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, each of us is to exercise them accordingly… This verse compares us to members of a body, which is an apt description. Our bodies are made up of a vast number of parts. From our heart, which can pump roughly 2000 gallons of blood throughout your body in just one day, to our bones, which are stronger than steel. When these parts work together and support one another, the human body is capable of amazing things. Similarly, our gifts may come in many difference forms and are helpful in many different areas of life. But, when we work together, we can support each other and help each other grow.

    As I come to a close, I want to remind you that you and I are not valuable because of certain strengths we may have, but instead because we are made in the image of God. God’s love for us does not depend on how far we can throw a discus or how fast we can sprint; it is important that we remember that we are all given different gifts and we ultimately are to use them to glorify God.


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Brandon, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

  • Being Bold and Confident yet Teachable

    “He who neglects discipline despises himself, 
    but he who listens to reproof acquires understanding.” 
    Proverbs 15:32 (NASB)

    I don’t know about you, but I sometimes find it hard to be bold and confident. There are many events we each experience daily that require us to be bold and confident. It can be frightening to put yourself out in the open by expressing your ideas in a class discussion, participating in a challenging activity during P.E., or even standing up and presenting a rhetoric reflection. I also find that in these situations it is much easier to stay closed up and watch quietly instead. Though this may be true, it is not what we ought to do. Rather than fearing the judgment of others, which is what often stops us from opening up, we ought to have courage and be bold with confidence. 


    Kaitlyn with her siblings, Jonathan and Rebecca

    We should not fear the judgments of others because we ought to be living our lives as pleasing to God rather than man. One of the ways we can do this is by searching for and defending God’s truth. Galatians 1:10 (NASB) says, “For am I now seeking the favor of men, or of God? Or am I striving to please men? If I were still trying to please men, I would not be a bond-servant of Christ.” In this verse Paul is specifically talking about how Christians must proclaim the Gospel in all its truth rather than watering it down to please men who do not completely agree with the message. Paul is urging Christians to preserve truth and we must do this with boldness, having confidence in Christ and His work on the cross.  

    When we as students, “put ourselves out there” in the class room by answering a question and offering an idea, we exert a certain amount of boldness. Though this is a good thing, as we search for truth through the guidance of our teacher, we may not always have the correct response or best idea. When this happens it is important to have a teachable heart because guided correction helps us learn and grow. Proverbs 15:32 (NASB) says, “He who neglects discipline despises himself, but he who listens to reproof acquires understanding.” According to this verse we must listen and accept correction to gain understanding.

    As a dancer, I experience correction all the time in the studio. I need to be bold and have confidence when I dance because I am putting myself out there to be corrected and judged. The corrections I receive from my ballet instructors are to help me improve my craft and become a better dancer. This is the same in our classrooms here at school. Dancing is also a preforming art so many people will judge dancers at auditions for jobs, camps, and preforming role. The judgements people make do not affect me because my identity is in Christ and I can have confidence in who He is.  

    We ought to be bold and confident but we must also be teachable. This can be very hard to balance. Specifically to the grammar schoolers I challenge you to raise your hands and answer the questions your teachers ask you, and when your answer is not exactly what they were looking for, learn from what new knowledge they have to share with you. And to the upper schoolers, I challenge you to participate in the class discussions we are so blessed to have. Express your thoughts and search for truth with the guidance of our teachers, being receptive to both positive and corrective feedback. 


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Kaitlyn, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

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