Covenant Blog

  • Why Wait for the New Year?

    “The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness.” Lamentations 3:22-23 (ESV)

    As you all know, New Year’s Eve was this past weekend, and so many of us celebrated Volleyball Girl Jessicawith our friends and family over the prospect of a new chapter in our lives. Maybe you watched the countdown or even shared your New Year’s resolutions with one another. But, have you ever wondered about the history behind these resolutions?

    Interestingly enough, the concept began during the height of the Christianized Roman Empire. The word January comes from the Latin word “ianua” (ya-new-ah), meaning “door.” This symbolizes the opening to the new year and the closing of the past one, which makes it extremely apropos to designate it as the first month of the year. New Year’s resolutions became customary around this time and were mainly focused on fasting and praising the Lord.

    New Year’s has always been symbolic of the phrase, “Out with old and in with the new.” It is said to be a time of setting things right emotionally, physically and spiritually. To this day, in some towns in Italy, people actually shove their old furniture and objects out of their windows to symbolize this time of rebirth. Sounds crazy, doesn’t it? While this is a rather extreme custom, we here have similar traditions that embody that same idea by setting moral goals, such as reading the Bible more or spending more time with family.

    Jessica at Dance

    Unfortunately, we usually only pursue this personal growth during times like New Year’s, but why wait a whole year for a clean slate when we have one every morning? Lamentations 3:22-23 (ESV) says, “The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; His mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning…” We are given 365 chances, and we choose one for the sake of tradition? This causes us to develop bad habits. The longer we wait, the harder it is to change what is second nature.

    We need to make the choice to obey God and strive for individual progress every day, not just on New Year’s. My charge to you is do not wait! Grow continually and set goals for yourself every day because His mercies are new every morning!


    StudiousAs part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Jessica G., one of our tenth grade students (pictured).

  • Friendship

    "My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one’s life for one’s friends." John 15: 12-13 (NIV)

    One day while I was sitting in history class, Mr. Ryan walked up to the whiteboard and said “Alright gang, today we are going to do something a little different rather than just talking about the Roman Empire. We are going to do some personal reflection questions.” Now, we had done these sorts of questions before, where you look inward and answer a question about yourself on a deeper level. This time, rather than being a question like “What gives meaning to your life,” the personal reflection question was. What do you value in a friendship?” After writing down and then sharing our answers with one another, it was Jon’s response that really made me think. He said “Carson, if we were in a different, say, bigger school, then we probably wouldn’t be as close of friends as we are now.” This really made me wonder, how have I become such close friends with people that are starkly different from me and have different opinions from my own?

    Carson D

    I eventually realized that it is because of our school’s small environment and tight knit community. Covenant is a place where you learn to become friends with people that aren't necessarily your “type,” which has many benefits. First, when you become friends with someone who has different opinions, it gives you a new perspective on life and it sharpens your own thoughts and ideas. Secondly, the qualities you may personally be lacking in might be the other person’s strongest traits. Ecclesiastes 4:9-10 says “Two are better than one because they have a good return for their labor. For if either of them falls, the one will lift up his companion. But woe to the one who falls when there is not another to lift him up.” (NASB) This passage really sums up what it means to be a friend: a friend is not just someone who you like to hang out with; it is someone who makes you a better person. It is someone who is there with you when times get tough and you need to be lifted up. Friendship brings joy and beauty to life—and I believe Covenant is a place that holds these values dear. Over the break, I challenge you to evaluate your friendships. Are you adding substance to the relationships you are in? Do you and your friend make each other better people, and how does your friendship affect all those around you?

    To end my reflection, I leave you with this: the bonds we have forged at this school will not easily be broken by whatever our future holds for us. Covenant has shaped us in many ways, but these friendships are what define us and our school. Thank you.


    Carson DAs part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Carson D., one of our tenth grade students (pictured).

  • Set Apart

    “Don’t let anyone think less of you because you are young. Be an example to all believers in what you say, in the way you live, in your love, your faith, and your purity.” 
    1 Timothy 4:12 (NLT)

    On the night of April 26, 1777, a messenger arrived at a farmhouse with urgent news that Sarah at the retreatthe British, had burned the city of Danbury, Connecticut, and were advancing on the countryside. Every farmer must be called out immediately. A patriot named Ludington volunteered for the job of riding and calling the farmers to fight.

    Ludington grabbed a big stick, leaped on a horse and galloped off into the darkness. It was an all-night ride, stopping at each farm house to bang the stick on the door and shout a warning, “The British are coming. Get out and fight!” And they did. Ludington roused enough men to not only stop the British, but to send them running back to their boats in defeat!

    Ludington far out did Paul Revere’s famous ride. Revere only got about 10 miles before he was captured by the British at Lexington. Ludington covered 40 miles of hard riding! This patriot was not a grown man as you might have imagined… but a 16 year-old girl named Sybil Ludington.

    Young Ludington didn’t know what the outcome of her actions would be. She simply acted out of personal conviction. I would like to explore that idea for a minute. As Christians, we all have God-given conviction, a moral drive to do certain things at certain times. Like Sybil Ludington we have a God-given conviction that lives inside of us today. God uses young people. As followers of Christ, with His aid, He empowers us to make a difference in this world.

    Now, I would like to challenge each of you. Go out, make a difference, have an impact, and change history. You and I are not the next generation, we are THIS generation and it’s time for us to get involved and be active in our world. With recent events in mind it’s clear to see that our country is rapidly moving away from our Christian roots. As the “generation of today”, it is critical that we are active in all parts of our country. 1 John 4:4-5 says, “But you belong to God, my dear children. You have already won a victory over those people, because the Spirit who lives in you is greater than the spirit who lives in the world. Those people belong to this world, so they speak from the world’s viewpoint, and the world listens to them.” (NLT) We are called to be set apart. I believe that as God’s children, our generation can be the spark that starts the fire to make a difference in our ever changing world.

    By simply acting out of the conviction of her heart, Sybil Ludington played a part in securing the freedom we enjoy today. As followers of Christ we are not called to live comfortable lives, we are called to be set apart. This task of being set apart, is not going to be easy, but it is by far the most fulfilling. It’s time for our generation to be different and do our part in showing Christ’s love to an ever changing, rocky world.

    Sarah in her letter jacket with Chessa

    As my reflection comes to an end I would like to close with a question: Covenant Academy, are you willing to have the courage to act, speak, and live out of your own God-given conviction? Regardless of what the outcome may be, are you willing to be bold and take the risk of being different?


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Sarah R., one of our eleventh grade students (pictured).

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