Covenant Blog
  • Aesop was not a Christian

    But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord,
    are being transformed 
    into the same image from glory to glory,
    just as from the Lord, the Spirit. 
    2 Corinthians 3:18 (NASB)

    Should we, as Christians, read classical literature written by non-Christians?

    There are a lot of books in this world. Libraries are full of them, many written by non-Christians. You have probably already read, or will read, books written by non-Christians for school.Should we disregard and not read literature written by people who are not Christian simply because they are not Christian? We should read them not for the author, but for the content. For example, Aesop was not a Christian, yet many valuable lessons are explained through his stories when viewed through Christian glasses. Each story ends with a moral that is true even if the author doesn't fully know the One who makes it true.

     

    Why would we read these books? Are they worth reading or should we disregard or discount them because they were writing by non-Christians? No! Truth can still be found in books written by non-Christians because we all reflect the image of God at all times, through our broken mirror. These stories still contain truths and reflect parts of God even though they may not know it, or even intend for it to. Even though some books are written by non-Christians, we shouldn't choose not to read them because they still reflect God and God’s creation. Now this doesn't mean that there aren't bad books out there that we shouldn't read. Some books are not edifying because they don’t reflect God’s beauty, truth and goodness.

    [CLICK HERE for more information on the list of Great Books we use at Covenant.]


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by Daniel, one of our eleventh grade students (pictured above).

  • Made in His Image

    “Let us make man in our image.” Genesis 1:26

    What does it mean to be made in the image of God? In His likeness? It means we are small, imperfect reflections of Him. Think of the sun. The sun brings light to everything, does it not? Without the sun, can you see? No, the light of the sun permeates the whole earth. It spreads over all, bringing light to everything. In the same way, God and His Word affect everything. It is the basis of all thought. It brings light to all and without Him we cannot see.

    Does anyone know how the moon shines? Does it create its own light like the sun? How does it shine? It reflects the light of the sun. The sun is roughly 400 times larger than the moon. The light we see from the moon is significantly less than the light from the sun, but it is still very evident in the sky. We as image bearers are like the moon. We reflect the light of God. Through one another we can see a dim reflection of God. We reflect His light, but we are only seen because of Him, because we are reflecting Him.

    Now, is the moon a perfect sphere? No, it is covered in craters, in imperfections. However, you can still see light from the imperfect moon. In the same way, we can only reflect a broken image. We also are imperfect. We are marred. We are flawed. We are broken. Only Christ can cover our imperfections, our flaws, our brokenness. Only He can save us. Only He can redeem us. Only the original light of the Son can brighten
    the dim.


    As part of their training in Rhetoric, our students in grades ten and up are required to develop and present a brief presentation to the school body during Chapel with guidance from their instructors and school curriculum. Each student presentation must be understandable and relevant to all age groups. Sowing seeds of rhetoric training by requiring them speak to all age levels has yielded a harvest for all to enjoy.

    This week’s presentation was given by one of our eleventh grade students.

  • Making Lunch

    Train up a child in the way he should go, Even when he is old he will not depart from it.
    Proverbs 22:6 

    When my oldest was in third grade, I had two little ones at home and one on the way. I was exhausted just trying to keep up with everything. But I insisted on making her lunch, filling her water bottle and getting her uniform out for the next day. I grew up in a single-parent home so I had unrealistic expectations of all that I would do to take care of my kids since I had to do everything for myself as a child.

    I kept this up for several years until one year, when I had two in school and two at home, I got walking pneumonia. I was down for the count for quite a while so my husband lovingly taught the children how to make their own lunches and fill their own water bottles, and get their own clothes out for the next day.

    And then he told them that this would continue even when I got better.

    I can’t tell you what a BLESSING that was to them and to me. They learned to become more responsible and they learned to find ways to help instead of finding ways to be helped. And I learned that I don’t have to be Super Mom just because my own mom was human.

    Now that my youngest is in eighth grade, I have even less time to make their lunches or even feel guilty about it. If you are struggling with “school preparation mania” or “Super Mom Syndrome” like I was, I encourage you to lighten your load. Your child can probably handle taking on some added responsibility. It prepares them for life and allows you to take a breath.

    Trust me, you’re still doing plenty.


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